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Great Man, Great Speech

remembering Ronald Reagan and The Boys of Pointe du Hoc


How Do Reagan, FDR, And Modern Conservatives View ‘The Forgotten Man’?



Today (June 5th) is the anniversary of Ronald Reagan's death in 2004. He was President during the three terms I served in the house (1983 – 1989) and he was the kind of leader who comes along rarely and, for some reason, when American seems especially to need one like him.

He had many gifts and we remember, especially, that one for language, rhetoric, and speechmaking.  One of his most memorable speeches was the one he gave commemorating the 40th anniversary of D-Day.  The title of that speech was The Boys of Pointe du Hoq.  

The anniversary of D-Day is Saturday, June 6th.  That speech is very much worth revisiting.  As Ronald Reagan is very much worth remembering.  I am still proud to think of myself as a Reagan Republican and for playing my part in the Reagan Revolution which was, fundamentally, about celebrating and defending freedom.


Photo Wikimedia

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D-Day
remember the heroes



 Source: U.S. Department of Defense photo via Wikimedia Commons


On the anniversary of this day, please take a moment to remember and to watch this very moving video, Honoring Our Fallen Heroes, from Hillsdale College.  Freedom comes at a high price.  But it is always worth it.